Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Rated G for Graphic . . .





Blouse: J. C. Penney's
Tank: Mossimo, Target
Skirt: Boscov's
Shoes: Journeys
Bag: Marshalls
Sunglasses: Cloud Nine, Ocean City Boardwalk






Blouse: So, Kohl's
Skirt: H&M
Shoes: Worthington, J. C. Penney's
Bag: Nine West, Ross
Bag charm: Walmart
Belt: Wet Seal
Sunglasses: J. C. Penney's






Blouse: Merona, Target
Cardigan: So, Kohl's
Skirt: Boscov's
Shoes: Betseyville, Macy's
Bag: Princess Vera, Kohl's
Belt: Marshalls
Sunglasses: J. C. Penney's






Blouse: Candie's, Kohl's
Skirt: Marshalls
Shoes: Qupid, Alloy
Bag: Candie's, Kohl's
Belt: Apt. 9, Kohl's






Tank: Worthington, J. C. Penney's
Cardigan: Gifted
Skirt: H&M
Shoes: Journeys
Bag: Apt. 9, Kohl's
Belt: Apt. 9, Kohl's
Sunglasses: J. C. Penney's






Tee: Merona, Target
Skirt: Kohl's
Shoes: Ami Clubwear
Bag: Target
Belt: Izod, Marshalls
Sunglasses: Kohl's






Top: Decree, J. C. Penney's
Skirt: Marshalls
Shoes: Worthington, J. C. Penney's
Bag: Nine West, Ross
Bag charm: Walmart
Scarf: Mossimo, Target
Sunglasses: J. C. Penney's

. . . is not something the Motion Picture Association usually says about animated features.  But I can't think of a more appropriate descriptor for this week's cartoonish, candy-bright (making good on last week's promise to deliver a dessert buffet), color-blocked clothes.  They're just the right backdrop for the real stars-slash-souffles (might as well mix my metaphors along with my separates), which are, of course, the accessories.

This time around I went on an upcycling adventure (far more fun and dare I say safer than the kind involving a bicycle).  I took nine beloved but boring store-bought pendants and gave them a makeover!  I keep a whole boxful of sad old jewelry for just such a purpose.  It's pretty Murky Dismal, just like Rainbow Brite's nemesis.  But it's also the source of much inspiration.  Crafting is, after all, little more than a cobbling together of disparate elements to create a cohesive (if kooky) whole.  I suspect I say this sort of thing a lot, but that's okay because it bears repeating.  Also, "cobbling" sounds a lot like cobbler, which is one of the homiest and most satisfying -- albeit not the most glamorous -- offerings of the buffet table crowd.  Anyway, a little glue and a lot of beads transformed these otherwise ordinary pieces into statements (even if it's unclear, as of yet, what they're saying.)  




I have to admit that it's a little strange seeing all these necklaces I wore long before I started crafting, all tarted up and out on the Interwebs.  It made me think of this article I read in the February Marie Claire about Sofia Boutella, an up-and-comer in the currently playing (and far from G-rated) Kingsmen: The Secret Service.  Being in the @Play column, it was all about her passion for -- what else? -- jewelry making.  "The repetition gets you into a trance," she explained, adding, "It's therapeutic."  Having whiled away more than a few weekends with a full On Demand queue and a fresh bag of beads, I knew just what she meant.  When friends urged Boutella to sell her work, she demurred on the grounds that it was just for her and her family and far too personal to put on the market.  "I'm not making a business out of this.  It's very sentimental," she said.  Although I run an Etsy shop, this too rang true with me.  Any time you create something, you include a little piece of yourself.  And when what you create is something to wear?  A piece of you is out there for everyone to see.  Or, in this case, purchase.

Kind of creepy when put that way, huh?

Still, I've always been of the mind that I make my stuff for me.  And part of that (not to get all hippy dippy) journey is putting it out there.  If someone else likes it, then that's just a bonus.  A tasty, last-piece-of-key-lime-pie-on-the-buffet-table bonus, but a bonus nonetheless.     

2 comments:

Jewel Divas Style said...

Great necklaces as always Tote, and I completely get it.

When I started making it was for me, when I considered making to sell it was hard because I worried I'd want it all and decided I had to distance myself from each piece.

Now, if I make a bracelet stack and have left overs, I make a similar style for me. But as my jewellery for sale sits here, I worry again that if it sells what will happen to it. Will the owner love it and take care of it? Will they keep it forever or treat it like rubbish and break it, or worse, sell it on ebay as their own? I'd probably buy it back, lol

I still have that little emotional tug inside because each piece is one off so I don't even have one to keep for myself or for the Jewel Divas archive, and I know I will miss it.

As for re-purposing, I'll be in jewellery making mode again this weekend as it's easter once again. Last easter I made the Opulence Royale collection and this time it will be stuff for me, making jewels to go with clothes etc.

I found some gunmetal grey crystal necklaces in a chain store the other day. Long, sparkly, three for $10, so I bought all six of them. I'll pull some apart to use the beads for other things, and go through my jewellery collection to see what I can freshen up or remake.

Michelle said...

I know what you mean, I sometimes feel that pull to get back into my very dusty studio but not yet. The timing is not right for me as my kids need to much of me, but I do feel as though a small part of me is missing and I LOVE making pieces for my daughter to wear and give away.